Footwear
I should note that about 3/4ths of the stuff I've made has gone to other people and so no one ever sees it.  It's pretty clear that the early stuff I was making was less than ideal.

 
Examples of tools and shoe bits from the Lecture for the University of Central Oklahoma Medieval Society (March 2002) Picture by God-knows-who (http://www.libarts.ucok.edu/humanities/Photo%20Album/)


Some examples of my earlier work



Turn shoe concept models for teaching. (1994, photo by Mitch Utsey Feb 2002
 

This is the first pair of boots (winter1994-5)  Metal eyelets, lapped seams and is a turned shoe made right side out (with needles).

This is the second pair of boots (1995). Notice how thick the leather is.  Originally these were made with lapped seams, but I later remade them with a more correct seam.

This is the third pair of boots (1995). The leather polymerized when I turned them.
     


This is one of a pair that were made in 1995-6 as a test of a "late Roman/early Saxon" design, and used copper rivets in lieu of hobnails.  Very educational.  Worn by Beorhtlic Fokwineson.

A failed experiment (1996)  This pair are lined with cotton fabric.

Made for Paul Shore (1996-7)

 A failed experiment (1996).  This pair is my first attempt at rightside out shoes, made without a last.
   

2 Button shoe 199
7

2 Button shoe 199
7

Made for Paul Shore 1997

Late 16th century right side out shoes with spring heels 1997

Laced Boot 1997
 




2 Button shoe (1998, photo by Mitch Utsey Feb 2002

Made for Paul Shore 1998

This is one of a pair that were made
for Beorhtlic Fokwineson's SCA
Laurelling in 1998. 
Loosely based
 on a Jorvick button shoe ("Anglo
Scandinavian Type 4"), these were
made from antique buck tanned deer.

This is one of a pair that were made in 1998 as a test of the Ballymacomb shoe ("Lucas Type 2") out of 10-12 oz leather.  Not what I would call a successful experiment, but they were wearable. Worn by Beorhtlic Fokwineson

A badly failed 15th century boot.  This is the boot that convinced me that you really need a last for narrow waisted footwear  -  April 1998


This is one of a pair that were made in 1999 as a later test of a "late Roman/early Saxon" design, using real hobnails.  Very educational.  Worn by Beorhtlic Fokwineson.
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Making a Medieval Shoe (1999)

Modern, non-medieval shoe, although using 16th century techniques (1999)

15th C Medieval boot design - test piece (1999)


Pit tanned outer sole from the test boot, based on 15th century examples.  Note - stitched with a straight awl.  I should note that the sole is the wrong shape because I was using a modern last for this piece.
   

Mock up of Ypres shoe (2000)

Modern, non-medieval shoe, although using 16th century techniques (2000)


Mock Up of "Cave of the Warrior" shoe from Jericho - original dated c.3300 BCE (2000)
     

Rus test boot based on an example from Lake Lagoda (2001)

Seam detail

Rus test boot based on an example from Lake Lagoda (2001)
     

Mock ups of Red Bay turnshoes, c1565  (the one on the right is inside out).  Made with pit tanned goatskin.  (Summer 2002)

Seam detail from Red Bay Shoes Mockup

Interpretation of the 1604 Watford shoe, hand sewn in waxed calf.  Hobnails (2002)
     
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Making a Medieval Shoe (February 2003)

also

 


A different interpretation of the 1604 Watford shoe, hand sewn in faux waxed calf.  No hobnails (2003)



Roman test boot - not based on any specific designs but on a number of technical design concepts (2003)

Opanke, based on numerous eastern European designs (2003)
   

Roman test boot (August 2004)

Fitter for shoe on the reproduction 1400s Last (September 2004)

Shoes for Sole Thickness tests on the reproduction 1400s Last (September 2004)

Ome of a pair of shoes for a friend's SCA knighting ceremony (Feb 2004)
         


Experimental 18th century shoe
January 2005

Williamsburg Shoe
11 February 2005

Early 15th century Shoe
24 April 2005
     

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Compiled by Marc Carlson
It was last edited 28 April 2005