PLATE XXIII

No. 1

LADY’S YELLOW SHOES

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

AN extremely perfect and dainty pair of lady’s shoes of bright yellow brocade, embroidered in floral designs with crimson silk and green wire, the pattern being displayed on each shoe with an utter disregard to uniformity. The stitching is throughout very neat. They are lined, as is very generally the case, with white canvas. The heels, which are nearly 2¾ inches high, are hollow, and are covered with brocade. The toes are rounded, the instep flaps are wide, as are also the buckle latchets. These shoes are reputed to have been worn by Lady Strafford at the trial of her husband (March, 1641), but the tradition is without foundation, as they belong to a later period. In the collection of the Author.

No. 2

A GENTLEMAN’S SHOE

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

AN extraordinary shoe, for a gentleman, with a heel far higher than is commonly found on shoes of this period; it measures full 6 inches in height. The shoe is extremely elegant, has latchets crossing the instep, and retains its original metal buckle of very ornate design. A similar shoe in the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kensington, is described as English, second half of the eighteenth century.  In the Museum, Whitby